Beauty & Body Image

Chrissy Metz on Losing Weight for Her Show: “I’m not selling out the big girls”

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The topic of ‘Chrissy Metz weight’ has been trending recently, after the first hit episodes of the new NBC show This Is Us. The 37 year-old actress plays Kate on the show, who is about lose weight as a result of gastric bypass surgery – and the actress is excited for the major journey she’s about to embark on. Chrissy recently opened up about her weight, body image and losing weight for her role:

On losing weight for the show:

It’s a different kind of motivation, so I was excited about it. In our contract, it did state that that would be a part of it, to lose the weight in the trajectory of the character as she comes to find herself. That was a win-win for me. Because it’s one thing to try to do it on your own. But as human beings, it’s an ego thing: We’re more likely to do something for someone else.

On the fact that losing weight doesn’t mean that she is betraying the bigger girls:

I, as Chrissy, want to do things that mentally, emotionally and physically make me the best that I can be. That’s the intention for our writers and the development of the character. I just have to be very clear. Whether or not I lose weight or stay the same, it’s purely a choice of mine for health. Not because I think that plus size, curvy, voluptuous, big bodies aren’t attractive — because I think they’re awesome and sexy. So I’ll just have to make sure that’s known, because I’m not selling out the big girls. I don’t do that. That’s not me.

On how at her size, weight is always the focus:

You know, it’s really hard for me because I have friends who are like, Why do we have to talk about the weight? Why can’t you just be an actor who happens to be overweight in the show and you’re moving on with your life? and I completely understand that. Eventually I know that that will be the case — there will just be plus-size actors and it’s not going to be talked about. However, this role is written about a woman who — it was loosely based on Dan Fogelman’s sister — who struggled with her weight and her self-worth. And a lot of people do, and I have myself, as a human being. So this is a story that needs to be told because there are people who find their self-worth in the number on the scale.

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See more photos of Chrissy inside!

 

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Chrissy Metz weight interview

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  • chris

    wow, she’s huge. i hope for her own sake she is successful in her endeavor to lose weight.

  • claud

    what she says is all good and kosher….except when you’re obese there’s the fact that she could drop dead any moment. i applaud her for making amends with the “plus size community”–it’s respectful, i guess…. but the fact of the matter is that they are not respecting their bodies. sure, there’s genetics and thyroid problems–but jesus effing christ, there’s also fresh produce and walking… try it sometime, obese people–you might live. (as you can see, i’m sick of this fat-acceptance bs).

    • chris

      true, she could have a heart attack any time really. Ive known a few people her size and none of them made it past 50. My father passed from a heart attack at 47 and he wasn’t even close to this big. And the fact is fat is becoming more normalized, more acceptable. My obese and overweight family members seem to think there is something wrong with me for being a healthy weight. Again, they nearly all suffer from health conditions like diabetes, high cholesterol, sleep apnea etc. Its just reality– people are not meant to be anywhere near this big at all. I don’t believe anybody with healthy self esteem can let themselves get this big either.

      • Stellar

        High cholesterol, on its own, is not a health condition. High cholesterol is linked to longevity and lowers the risk of cancers. Also, contrary to popular, and orthodox medicine, it does not cause heart disease.

        • chris

          well there is good and bad cholesterol, unbalanced levels of ldl are really what is bad and that is what is caused by an unhealthy lifestyle.

          • Stellar

            Nah, not really. LDL and HDL are bollocks. All cholesterol is linked to longevity and good health. The distinctions are medical discourse not based on fact. In fact, people who take cholesterol lowering drugs are at risk of developing, amongst other things, diabetes.

          • chris

            Hmm, well you’re free to your opinion I’ll stick with the AHA and nearly every other medical professional who’s done years of studying and research, Maybe they are wrong, but unlikely.

          • aline

            Care to link the studies?

          • Stellar

            Can’t link but can suggest you check out Uffe Ravnskov. He is a Danish independent researcher (ie, not funded by any drug company etc) whose website is fantastic and has peer reviewed papers as well as thoroughly plausible citations to support his independent research.

            Also, see Professor Beatrice Golomb (MD, PhD) of UCSD- Principal investigator of UCSD Department of Medicine, whose extensive research is independently funded and basically sys that statins are only effective for a very small subsection of male patients with coronary heart disease and should not be taken by anyone else particularly women.

            BTW, I’m not some anti-drug company, anti-vaccination nut, but I am on a mission to help these well respected researchers (amongst many others) get their message out there.

            Their wok is thoroughly independent and plausible in a way that the orthodox ‘opinions’ are simply not. Their work is factual as opposed to the tenuous opinion of the drug companies that did the (flawed) studies on the safety and efficacy of statins.

            End of rant 😉

          • aline

            Well I know there are some doctors lately going on about cholesterols and bashing statins and other anti-cholesterol drugs for not being useful and claiming low cholesterol levels being associated with cancer,alzheimer and exc.But medicine is science.They gotta prove their theories/hypothesises with massive multiple trials/studies or keep their hush till they do so(they might be right in the long run but thay doesn’t change the fact their hypothesis has to be proven in order to be takeb seriously).I am a doctor myself and have experienced more than once that people who gave upon their anti-cholesterol treatments due to speculations like this ended up in the angiography room.So yeah,I prefer to keep my LDL low till a better study proves otherwise.

  • Sarah

    I really hope there won’t come a time when being this obese is so normal to us, that “there will just be plus-size actors and it’s not going to be talked about.”

    Obesity is officially classified as a disease. We’d never hope that other diseases, like alcoholism etc., become so normal to us that we won’t think anything of it anymore when seeing it on TV.

    I couldn’t help but compare her to Michael J. Fox, who has Parkinson’s disease, and uses his presence in TV-Shows and movies to raise awareness for the disease, and there’s she, visibly obese, but instead of saying “yes, obesity is a problem in our society, yes we want to lose weight, yes we struggle, yes it influences how we go about our daily lives, yes, it has a negative impact on our health”, instead of using this as a platform to raise awareness and understanding for obesity as a disease, she just downplays the discussion to the normal talk about weight.

  • Helena

    I think i have never seen a person this big in real life. I wish her the best, it’s surely a battle if you carry that much extra weight.

    • Stellar

      Yeah, terribly unhealthy at this weight and the best thing is to never get to this stage because losing it, permanently, is fairly unlikely.

  • S

    Hope she loses the weight and feels great about it. On another note she is aging very well. Some of the ultra thin actresses age poorly. She barely has any wrinkles on her face.

    • Mel

      That probably won’t continue to be the case once she loses a significant amount of weight. Her face will deflate, leaving loose, slack skin, although she may have a procedure to rectify that, too.