Mila Kunis: “I don’t wear makeup. I don’t wash my hair every day”

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On her natural style:

“I don’t wear makeup. I don’t wash my hair every day. It’s not something that I associate with myself. I commend women who wake up 30, 40 minutes early to put on eyeliner. I think it’s ­beautiful. I’m just not that person. So to go to a shoot and have my makeup artist put on face cream and send me off to do a photo, I was like, ‘Well, this makes life easy.’ And you’re still protected. Nobody’s there to make you look bad.”

On Photoshop:

“There was a company that I did a photo shoot for once that manipulated the photo so much, I was like, ‘That’s not even me.’ Like, what’s the point? You wanted my name, and then you wanted the version of me that I’m not. I absolutely hate it. Now, do I sometimes want them to depuff my eyes, help me out with a little bit of lighting? [Sure.] But do I want them to stretch my legs, thin out my waist, curve my hips, elongate my neck, blah, blah, blah? No.”

… says 32 year-old Mila.

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Harper’s Bazaar Faces Criticism For ‘Transform Your Body’ Post

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Harper’s Bazaar is currently facing a lot of criticism for a Facebook post that users say promotes a “sickly and unhealthy” body image due to the image attached to the message, representing a skinny figure in a bikini. More details from Huffington Post:

On Wednesday, the glossy posted a photo of a thin woman emerging from the water wearing a bikini. The photo was accompanied by the caption, “How to completely transform your body—in ONLY two weeks,” followed by a link to Harper’s Bazaar’s online post, “The Two-Week Body Makeover: The Workout.” (The image on Facebook is also used as the main image for the accompanying post.)

Facebook users were quick to call out the magazine, calling them out for promoting unhealthy body ideals.

This image looks so unhealthy AND unattractive. Promoting this kind of body image is appalling,” wrote one.

“I can’t believe Harper’s Bazaar posted this! My little sister has [an eating disorder] and its because of images like this. She thinks she has to starve herself to be beautiful because that’s what she sees posted on a daily basis as beauty. This makes me mad because this woman doesn’t look healthy,” wrote another.

And while some users accused fellow commenters of skinny shaming, others were quick to retort, pointing out that while the woman in the photo may be “healthy and thriving,” this isn’t a “healthy” body for the average woman.

“I don’t think the issue is with this model personally. She may very well be that thin naturally, and that’s her body and she shouldn’t be shamed for it. However I think the issue most people are having is that using this particular physique for an article clearly aimed towards weight loss and exercise is only aiding in providing girls and women with unrealistic body goals,” wrote one user.

She continued, “Pictures used in this context tend to be the cause of and product of many problems related to both unhealthy ‘dieting’ as well as mental health issues when it comes to women and young girls.”

What is your take on this? Share your thoughts!

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