Demi Lovato: “Food is still the biggest challenge in my life”

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On the things that trigger her eating disorder:

When I was in a relationship with Wilmer I went three years without purging and when we broke up that’s one of the first things I did. What started the relapse was missing Wilmer. And when I feel lonely my heart feels hungry and I end up binging.

On food being her biggest daily struggle:

The less I have to think about food, the easier it is to go about having a normal life and I don’t want to let anybody down so when I do have moments when I slip up, I feel very ashamed. Food is still the biggest challenge in my life and it controls — I don’t want to give it the power to say it controls my every thought, but it’s something that I’m constantly thinking about.

On being a good role model:

So, for me, it’s like kind of admitting that I’m not … Obviously I’m not perfect, but admitting that on camera. I want to be the best role model that I can be for my fans, so by admitting that I’m not perfect, it’s kind of weird for me.

… says Demi, as she shared her recovery image on Instagram.

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Jennifer Lawrence: “I was told by producers of a film to lose 15 pounds in two weeks”

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The full story from People:

“When I was much younger and starting out, I was told by producers of a film to lose 15 pounds in two weeks,” she said, revealing another actress before her had already been fired for not losing the weight fast enough. But it did not end there, she said.

“During this time a female producer had me do a nude line-up with about five women who were much, much, thinner than me. We are stood side-by-side with only tape on covering our privates,” she added. “After that degrading and humiliating line-up, the female producer told me I should use the naked photos of myself as inspiration for my diet.”

Lawrence said she tried to stand up for herself and told another producer she thought the weight loss demands were not appropriate.

“He said he didn’t know why everyone thought I was so fat, he thought I was ‘perfectly f~~~able.’” The actress said she felt “trapped” by the experience. “I let myself be treated a certain way because I felt I had to for my career,” she shared. “I’m still learning that I don’t have to smile when a man makes me uncomfortable,” she added. “Every human being should have the power to be treated with respect because they’re human.”

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Mayim Bialik: “The upside of not being a ‘perfect ten’: no men asking me to meetings in their hotel rooms”

455E719E00000578-4982764-Ridiculous_Mayim_defended_herself_writing_Anyone_who_knows_me_an-a-102_1508093935129 - Mayim Bialik: "The upside of not being a 'perfect ten': no men asking me to meetings in their hotel rooms"

41 year-old Big Bang Theory actress Mayim Bialik recently wrote an article for the New York Times in response to the numerous sexual harassment and assault claims involving Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein – and she received a lot of criticism for her piece, with various sources claiming that she is ‘victim-blaming’:

I entered the Hollywood machine in 1986 as a prominent-nosed, awkward, geeky, Jewish 11-year-old — basically a scrawnier version of the person I am today. Back then we didn’t have the internet or social media or reality TV, but I didn’t need any of that to understand that I didn’t look or act like other girls in my industry, and that I was immersing myself in a business that rewarded physical beauty and sex appeal above all else.

I grew up constantly being teased about my appearance, even from members of my family; my nose and chin were the main objects of discussion. As a teenager I started obsessing over the possibility of a nose job so that I would look more like Danica McKellar, with a chin job to balance things out. Soon I wondered if I should get breast implants to look more like Christina Applegate, who got so much attention for her curves. I consistently felt like a troll compared to many of my contemporaries. A “TV Guide” critic described me, in a review of the pilot episode of “Blossom,” as having a “shield-shaped” face of “mismatched features.” I never recovered from seeing myself that way.

I always made conservative choices as a young actress, largely informed by my first-generation American parents who were highly skeptical of this industry in general — “This business will use you up and throw you away like a snotty tissue!”— and of its men in particular: “They only want one thing.” My mom didn’t let me wear makeup or get manicures. She encouraged me to be myself in audition rooms, and I followed my mother’s strong example to not put up with anyone calling me “baby” or demanding hugs on set. I was always aware that I was out of step with the expected norm for girls and women in Hollywood.

As a “nontraditional”-looking woman, I came back to an industry that had me auditioning for the “frumpy friend” or the “zaftig secretary,” though I eventually landed a role that has earned me four Emmy nominations. Is it a surprise that I play an androgynous, awkward, late bloomer?

And yet I have also experienced the upside of not being a “perfect ten.” As a proud feminist with little desire to diet, get plastic surgery or hire a personal trainer, I have almost no personal experience with men asking me to meetings in their hotel rooms. Those of us in Hollywood who don’t represent an impossible standard of beauty have the “luxury” of being overlooked and, in many cases, ignored by men in power unless we can make them money.

I still make choices every day as a 41-year-old actress that I think of as self-protecting and wise. I have decided that my sexual self is best reserved for private situations with those I am most intimate with. I dress modestly. I don’t act flirtatiously with men as a policy.

And if — like me — you’re not a perfect 10, know that there are people out there who will find you stunning, irresistible and worthy of attention, respect and love. The best part is you don’t have to go to a hotel room or a casting couch to find them.

Thoughts?

Read the full piece HERE!

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Rihanna: “I actually have had the pleasure of a fluctuating body type”

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On her recent weight transformation:

‘I actually have had the pleasure of a fluctuating body type, where one day I can literally fit into something that is bodycon, and then the next day – the next week – I need something oversized.’

‘If you take it further, it’s like: “What week are you having? You having a skinny week? You having a fat week? Are we doing arms this week? We doing legs this week? We doing oversized?”‘

… says Rihanna.

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