Bridget Malcolm

Bridget Malcolm: “Eat real food, not too much, mostly plants!”

484A5D5000000578-5286195-image-a-21_1516319144115 - Bridget Malcolm: "Eat real food, not too much, mostly plants!"

On the importance of consuming plenty of fats:

I think the idea that fat is bad is complete bull. Fat is an extremely important macronutrient – we need it for healthy hormone function, strong hair, skin and nails, not to mention our need for fat soluble vitamins such as A, D, E and K. Plus it makes food taste delicious, and keeps us satiated. I am a huge advocate for healthy fat in our diets, and I wish it were less vilified. Where I feel we go wrong however, is the sources of fat that we choose to consume. When we eat large quantities of plant-derived oils such as palm seed oil, we throw out our ratios of Omega 3 to 6 to majorly favor Omega 6. This is not good; our diets should be skewed to favor Omega 3 as much as possible, in order to reduce inflammation, and maintain good general mental health. We want a 1.5:1 ratio ideally. Maintaining this ratio is tricky – vegetable oils are everywhere! Consuming high levels of fat from animal foods is not ideal either; a high intake of saturated fat can lead to heart disease and other complications down the line.

On what she eats:

I love avocado, olives and nuts. Walnuts and macadamia nuts in particular are a good hook up of omegas. When cooking I choose a high quality olive oil or avocado oil. If you eat fish, enjoy wild salmon regularly. A good, high quality algae oil is a great call for the vegans out there – just to make sure you hit your requirements. Plant-based food sources contain the precursor ALA, and it has a low conversion rate to the important DHA – so make sure you supplement here!

On preferring fats to carbs:

I eat a lot of fat in my diet. I tend to avoid refined carbohydrates, and I make up for it by eating a higher level of fat in my diet. I could never ever be a HCLF person – my digestion just isn’t strong enough for all those carbohydrate spikes! Every person is different, and it is up to you to find out how much of each macronutrient ensures you feel the best. Nut butters are delicious and a great travel snack. My only issue with them is to ensure that there aren’t any other oils, salt or sugar added. I also find sticking to single serves ideal, because that stuff is moreish!

On her motto:

Eat real food, not too much, mostly plants.

… says the 25 year-old Australian beauty.

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480BA29800000578-5286195-image-a-28_1516319189469 - Bridget Malcolm: "Eat real food, not too much, mostly plants!"

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29 Comments on "Bridget Malcolm: “Eat real food, not too much, mostly plants!”"

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sarah
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sarah

Yawn, so plain she makes oatmeal look exciting

Heather
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Heather

Not that she’d know what oatmeal looks or tastes like!

Charlotte
Guest
Charlotte

I’m 100% sure that she does

Terae
Guest
Terae

you know that type of disordered eating/thinking where you research every single minute detail about food, what you are (or are not) consuming, nutrients, macros/micros, you know where you are basically OBSESSED but you don’t actually eat a lot of it? Yeah. Not making grand assumptions here but just seems a bit off….

Ali
Guest

I agree with you here. it is one of the signs.
question, however: do you think that as models they have to know these things, in order to stay as thin as possible whilst still being healthy and meeting your daily requirements? Honestly i don’t know – i’m just asking.

Camille
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Camille

Orthorexia is the word. To be obsessive with eating healthy and to be very restrictive about it.

Charlotte
Guest
Charlotte
You know (and this is not particularly directed at you Camille), in the West I believe people in general have a distorted view of what “normal” eating is. When a famous person talks about their clean and healthy diet, that is in some way restrictive but leaves some room for cheat days or occasional treats– every “average” person labels this as “super healthy”, “hard”, “bland”, “boring”,etc. Whereas it is my belief that a somewhat restrictive (we need restrictions in most areas of life btw), healthy and portion-controlled diet SHOULD be the norm, and should be seen as NORMAL. This is… Read more »
anna
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anna
I agree with what you’re saying about how messed up our culture’s relationship with food is, but I don’t think Bridget’s approach is any better – it’s just another extreme in the opposite direction. To me, healthy balanced eating means no food is completely off limits – it’s just portion controlled, as you mentioned, depending on what it is. Eating fried foods, junk food, desserts, candy, alcohol, etc, (even soda I suppose) are all fine at the right amount – the right amount is just much less than what a lot of people think it is. And making sure you’re… Read more »
Charlotte
Guest
Charlotte
I completely agree with you, and I think Bridget’s overanalyzing and thinking about food IS probably a reaction to the unhealthy industry she works in, and a way to keep control. It is a bit obsessive indeed, but I don’t get the feeling she has “orthorexia”. She probably gets a lot of questions about this AND is making money with her blog etc. Regarding the Asian cultures; having traveled the continent extensively and having plenty of Asian female friends: indeed they don’t analyze fat/protein/carb contents extensively but they do regularly skip a meal to keep their weight on the lower… Read more »
ule
Guest
I get the same vibe. Her blog actually has good, reasonable advice, but I’m not so sure she actually sticks to them herself. It’s easy to preach one thing and do the other without even realizing it. I have no idea what that blip with “too much protein” was, should’ve backed that up with numbers. She’s now studying for bachelors in food science and nutrition. She obviously likes being skinny for her job. In one of her posts she says she has the “fat genes” that she suppresses, in another one she advises someone to give up the hopes of… Read more »
emily
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emily
I think its refreshing that she knows what she is talking about. If she weren’t a model, but a nutritionist, would you still think her lifestyle and approach to food is disordered? I’m a nutrition major, and a long distance runner, so focusing on macronutrients-fat, carbs, and protein- and monitoring specific vitamin and mineral intake is necessary to thrive in exercise and maintain mental and physical strength. Not to mention, I can track deficiencies (for me iron, b12, and vitamin D) and manipulate my diet to perform and most importantly, feel my best. This doesn’t make me disordered, it makes… Read more »
CarrieD
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CarrieD
I was actually expecting her advice to be a lot worse. It seems pretty much in line with what I’ve read lately from actual professionals. But I still don’t buy that she follows what she preaches, or I at least think she eats very very little, even if she eats “right”. Also disagree with the protein thing, that notion that you shouldn’t have any source of protein bigger than what fits in your palm is pretty outdated. There’s even new information that says eggs aren’t that bad for you if you’re otherwise healthy and there’s no need to restrict them… Read more »
ayw
Guest

It’s definitely good to be aware of what is in food, what you’re eating, and what you need, but it is not necessary to track everything precisely unless you have serious competition goals (eg bodybuilding), and it is not necessary to have off-limit foods. If you are constantly thinking all day about what’s in your food and what you’ve eaten or need to eat then food is taking up way too much mental space and I don’t believe that leads to optimal life happiness.

ule
Guest
She actually writes not a bad blog for teenagers/young adults. She encourages others to enjoy exercise, eat healthily without obsessing over it, give up veganism if it doesn’t work for them, stand against abuse, see a doctor if you have problems. She’s now even studying for bachelors in food and nutrition. However I’m not sure she actually follows her own advice (and that “too much protein” post was just plain weird, should have backed that up with numbers). It’s easy to do the opposite of what you preach without even realizing it. She obviously likes being thin for her job… Read more »
ule
Guest

Ok, my comment didn’t show up and I wrote another basically same one, I have too much time apparently 😐

Silent observer
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Silent observer

That’s not her motto – she lifted that from Michael Pollen. I hope she credits him.

Guest
Altra

yeah i came here to say that, but it could have been taken out of context by the owner of the site

Nonny
Guest
Nonny

She is hardly the one to give nutritional advice. Consider the following:
She claims to eat 1500-1600 calories a day.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-5098391/VS-model-Bridget-Malcolm-defends-claims-skinny.html
Her height is 5ft10.
Assuming she weighs 125lbs, with her constant working out, her tdee should be around 2400 calories a day and is slightly underweight.
https://tdeecalculator.net/result.php?s=imperial&age=25&g=female&lbs=125&in=70&act=1.725&bf=&f=1

A chronic undereater. I predict osteoporosis in 20 yrs.

Ari
Guest

Rude. Plenty of people who have osteoporosis are overweight. Also think she weighs more than 125. She’s not as thin as she tries to appear. Lais ribeiro is thinner than her side by side and so are many of the other VS girls. She has issues with food because she’s a model but not the thinnest girl naturally so she goes the extra mile to look thinner on IG

Lyla
Guest
Lyla

looks like a lovely 11 yo prepubescent preteen

jjj2
Guest
jjj2

She really looks amazing. She has a very nice body, good for her, her diet seems to be working for her.

Stellar
Guest
Stellar

‘Her’ motto is actually Michael Pollard’s: eat food, not too much, mostly plants.
Plagiarising is not on. As if a ditz like this girl could ever come up with a motto as elegantly pithy as this one.
Disordered eating is strong here.

Stellar
Guest
Stellar

*Pollen.
And also see below…
And in fact, her obsession with avoiding carbohydrates, salt and sugar (all real foods) indicate she has no idea about what Pollen’s words imply.

Taylor
Guest
Taylor

Seriously, she sounds EXACTLY like me at the height of my eating disorder. It’s good that she’s knowledgable re: nutrition, but she seems downright obsessive.

herpderp
Guest
herpderp

She’s the typical Bondi chick. I don’t see any major appeal but maybe she has a better body IRL.

Delicate Dream
Guest
Delicate Dream

No comment on her health, but I don’t think her body is attractive at this size.

Pennylope
Guest
Pennylope

My body looked exactly like this when I was about 5kg underweight with a bmi of 17… My body was so stressed and I looked like a child at 21 years old. :S

Guest
lineplay

Great, thanks for the advice. I’m sure I can eat that and do my very physically demanding job at the same time. A lot of the nutrition advice is for sitting-at-a-desk-all-day, which isn’t everyone. Even just standing all day like you would at retail or fast food can tire you out faster. And sadly the most expensive things to buy are meats, veggies and fruits. Carbs and bad fats are so cheap and widely available it’s hard for some people on a certain salary to jump from $50 on food every two weeks to $100+.

Jason
Guest
Jason

It’s not really her motto. It is actually originally from a book called Food Rules by Micheal Pollock.

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