Super Skinny Celebrity Files: Tara Reid


Super Skinny Celebrity Files: 40 year-old actress Tara Reid, who looked quite frail as she attended the Maxim magazine Halloween Party in Los Angeles, where she wore a racy Greek-inspired costume.

A few months back, the thin actress was tired of being criticized for her trademark super skinny celebrity status, so she clarified a few things:

I feel great about my body. People always tell me to eat a burger — I love burgers! If I were to gain 10 pounds, I’d be asked why I got fat. I’m thin — and I’m good with that. People need to stop with the body shaming! I won’t let what anyone says stop me from enjoying my life. I truly feel I need to constantly prove myself in this business. I’ve done 46 movies, and it’s still tough to get roles when you’re misunderstood and judged.

More of Tara on the second page!


Read more

Ariel Winter: “I developed these boobs and butt & I started getting all this hate”


Ariel Winter recently opened up about her journey in front of the critical eyes of her haters, who, since she developed ‘boobs and butt’, started to attack her constantly:

Ariel Winter started out in Hollywood at just 11 years old. Naturally, as she got older, her body matured — and that, unfortunately, is where the Internet got ugly. “I was called every name in the book: fat, a slut, trashy, ugly,” she tells Stylish. But she’s not tolerating that talk anymore. She’s fighting back — and educating young girls in the process.

Right after I started developing, I automatically started getting all this hate. I developed these boobs and butt, and everything changed,” the Modern Family actress, 18, tells Stylish. “And as I got older, it only seemed to get worse.”

That’s why she decided to partner with Dove on its 12-year-old confidence campaign, the Self Esteem Project, which aims to inspire girls through research, education and understanding of their bodies. “What I think is really amazing about it is that we’re empowering young women to love themselves, to be comfortable with themselves,” she says. “And it’s not just about [liking] what they look like, but loving who they are.”

The Sofia the First star notes that 62 percent of young girls don’t know how to use the Internet to get the information that could help them understand that when it comes to bodies, each one is unique, and there’s no such thing as “right” or “wrong.” “We’re teaching them … so we can change the scape, so they don’t have to grow up the way I did,” Winter explains.

“I read a lot of the stories young women will send me about their body positivity and their body journeys, and that really helps me,” she says. “There are a lot of young women who are going through the same thing that I went through, and I think it’s important that we all empower each other. It makes it easier.”

More pictures of Ariel next!


Read more

Introducing NEW SVC Men: First Plus-Size Male Model Zach Miko


That’s right: from now on (as a result of many requests over the years), Skinny VS Curvy will feature, besides women and their wide range of body shapes and body image issues, MEN!

And here we are, launching our new category with the first plus-size male model – Zach Miko, who was signed a few months back with ING Models, modeled for Target and became the image of a ‘brawn’ model or the equivalent of ‘curve’ for women. Zach’s stats:

Age: 26

Height: 6ft 6in / 198cm

Waist: 40in / 102cm

On how society views men who have body image issues as un-masculine:

I always had my own body-image struggle. With men, there is still a lot of bravado and false masculinity to get through. You’re not supposed to care about how you look. If you have issues, you aren’t supposed to talk about it. It’s considered weak or un-masculine. Which is stupid. It’s about having feelings that make you human. I think, even now with the progression, you still have that 1950s male mentality of men being strong and emotionless. If it makes men realise that it’s OK to care about how you look, or even feel bad about it and want to change … I have had [body] issues all my life and that can make you insecure. You project those feelings on to others and that can damage relationships. It creates this vicious cycle. It could all be avoided if you opened up and said I do or don’t feel good about myself.

On the cause of his insecurities and trying to make people feel good about themselves:

I was between diets and trying to change the way I look for so long. As an actor, I was told by every casting director that I was too big. But I think I was trying to make other people more comfortable. I have always been a big guy, I was picked on as a kid, and that’s where it came from. We live in a society where “big” and “fat” have become insults, and “skinny”, “little” and “petite” have become compliments. We have come to correlate a negative meaning with “big” and “fat”.

On the fact that plus0sized people can be healthy:

I am a big advocate of health. I just don’t think you have to be a twig to [be healthy]. Other people don’t have a right to project an idea of unhealthy on to you if you have this extra weight. I think labeling people as unhealthy is unfair. You don’t know what their health is. People think I’m a slob and that I don’t take care of myself. But I do. For starters, I cycle every day. But you do start to internalize that [feeling].

… says Zach.


More pictures of the first plus-size male model next!


Read more